Liegt der Punkt auf der Geraden?

Eine Gerade ist eine Linie durch zwei Punkte.  Sind zwei Punkte gegeben, können wir die beiden Punkte verbinden und erhalten dadurch eine eindeutig festgelegte Gerade.

Alle Punkte einer Geraden sind miteinander verbunden. Wie genau die Punkte miteinander verbunden sind, wird durch die Geradengleichung festgelegt Jeder Punkt der Geraden erfüllt die Geradengleichung.

Was bedeutet „Ein Punkt erfüllt die Geradengleichung“?

Wenn der Punkt P mit den Koordinaten \( (1 / 5) \) auf der Geraden liegt, dann muss auf der linken und rechten Seite der Geradengleichung das Gleiche heraus kommen, wenn wir für \( x=1 \) und \( y=5 \) einsetzen.

Für unsere rote Gerade lautet die Geradengleichung:

$$ y = x + 4 $$

Mit den Zahlen für den Punkt P erhalten wir:

$$ 5 = 1 + 4 $$

Damit können wir sicher sein, dass der Punkt \( P(1/5) \) auf der Geraden liegt. Überprüfen wir einen anderen Punkt – zum Beispiel \( A(2/-3) \) – dann erhalten wir

$$ -3 = 2 + 4 $$

Das stimmt nicht und damit können wir sagen: A liegt nicht auf der Geraden.

 

Unit Conversion – an alternative approach

This post is inspired by a blog post from Ed Southall (@solvemymaths) where he writes about the typical unit conversion problem.

I have of course the same experience of students struggling with unit conversion problems and I have also tried different approaches of „making them understand“.

For older students (16+) I have tried a more formal approach which at least for some works quite well.  It requires a closer look and deeper understanding of how we write physical quantities and what we actually mean by saying the area of a rectangle is 24 cm2.

What is the meaning of 24cm?

Let’s look at how we calculate the area of a rectangle:

$$ Area = length \times width $$

Length and width are both physical quantities. Physical quantities are not  just numbers, they are a number plus a unit of length which is somehow attached to the number.

So what does „attached“ mean?

$$ length = 6 cm $$

Attached means that what we actually mean is this:

$$ length = 6 \cdot 1 cm$$

We have unit of length (think of it as a ruler or yardstick) and we measure by applying it 6 times the the side of the rectangle.

Let’s go back to calculating the area of the rectangle (and let’s say width = 6cm):

$$ Area = (6 \dot 1 cm) \cdot (4 \cdot 1 cm) $$

Rearranging gives us

$$ Area = (6 \cdot 4) \times (1 cm) \cdot (1 cm) $$

$$ Area =24 \cdot (1 cm)^2 $$

$$ Area =24  cm^2 $$

Two important insights

  1. We can separate the amount (the number) from the unit of measure:
    $$ 6 cm = 6 \times 1 cm $$
  2. By using the longhand notation we can work with units the same way we  work with regular variables:
    $$  3 cm \cdot 2 cm = (3 \cdot 2)\times (1 cm) \cdot (1 cm) = 6 \times (1cm)^2 $$

Let’s convert some units

How do we use these two insights for the task of converting units? Let’s say we want to convert the area of a rectangle from m2 to mm2:

$$ A = 17m^2 = … mm^2$$

First we separate the amount from the unit

$$ A = 17 \cdot 1 m^2 $$

Next we rewrite the shorthand notation m2 to the explicit form:

$$ A = 17 \cdot (1 m \times 1 m) $$

Now we start the stepwise conversion process by substituting for the unit of  1m the equivalent of 100cm:

$$ A = 17 \cdot (1 m \times 1 m) = 17 \cdot (100 cm \times 100 cm) $$

100cm can again be written as \( 100 \cdot 1cm \):

$$ A = 17 \cdot (100 \cdot 1 cm) \times (100 \cdot 1 cm) $$

Now we rearrange the terms and multiply the numbers:

$$ A = 17 \cdot 100 \cdot 100  \times ( 1cm \cdot 1 cm) = 170000 cm^2$$

Since we want to convert to mm2 we need to do one more step and start the same procedure again – this time substituting 1 cm with 10mm:

$$ A = 170000 cm^2 = 170000 \cdot (1 cm \cdot 1 cm)$$

$$ A = 170000 \cdot (10 mm \cdot 10 mm) $$

$$ A = 170000 \cdot 100  \cdot (1 mm \cdot 1mm)$$

$$ A = 17000000 mm^2$$

It’s a bit lengthy and formal, but…

Yes, the process is a bit lengthy but the upside is: It works for any kind of unit conversion! 

Suppose we want to convert yards per minute into km/h.

$$ v = 13 yd / min = … km / h$$

$$ v = 13 \times \frac{1 yd }{1 min} $$

1 yd equals 0.9144 m which we can substitute:

$$ v = 13 \cdot \frac{0.9144 m }{1 min} $$

1 m is 1/1000 km and 1 min is 1/60 of 1h:

$$ v = 13 \cdot \frac{0.9144 \cdot 1/1000 (1 \cdot km) }{1/60 (1 \cdot h)} $$

Multiply all the numbers:

$$ v = 13 \cdot \frac{ \frac{0.9144}{1000}  }  { \frac{1}{ 60} } \cdot (1 km) / (1 h) $$

$$ v = 0,713232 km/h$$